Secured Loans

A secured loan is a loan in which the borrower pledges some asset (e.g. a car or property) as collateral for the loan, which then becomes a secured debt owed to the creditor who gives the loan. The debt is thus secured against the collateral — in the event that the borrower defaults, the creditor takes possession of the asset used as collateral and may sell it to regain some or all of the amount originally lent to the borrower, for example, foreclosure of a home. From the creditor’s perspective this is a category of debt in which a lender has been granted a portion of the bundle of rights to specified property. If the sale of the collateral does not raise enough money to pay off the debt, the creditor can often obtain a deficiency judgment against the borrower for the remaining amount. The opposite of secured debt/loan is unsecured debt, which is not connected to any specific piece of property and instead the creditor may only satisfy the debt against the borrower rather than the borrower’s collateral and the borrower.

Secured loans are available to people who have been denied unsecured loans. They are an excellent way to work towards building your credit score. Banks like them because there is less risk involved. The lower interest rates are also an advantage to choosing a secured loan. You should be careful as you choose what you will use as collateral most banks require a home or a car in order to give the loan, although a savings account such as a CD may work, but you will not be able to access that money for the entire duration of the loan.

The interest rate for a secured loan depends upon various factors such as the amount of money you borrow, the length of time and personal details. You can also insure your payments for peace of mind, so you do not have to worry if you lose your job or are unable to work because of accident or sickness.